Update and New Photos, November 10, 2016

Most all of the fieldwork has been wrapped up on site at 810 Royal as of this point, though it is possible that we will return to the site if timing should allow for us to access the areas beneath the existing slabs. Even without that access, we’ve recovered a tremendous amount of data. Now, we’re engaged in the most time-consuming (and not-so-glamorous) part of an archaeological dig: processing everything that was recovered, and writing up the results of excavations. There are still many bags of artifacts to be washed and sorted. Volunteers are welcome in our lab, and students (including ones from other universities) are invited to develop collaborative research projects with us. In particular, we are seeking students who intend to specialize in zooarchaeology, archaeobotanical analysis, and Colonial era Native American pottery. Email Dr. Gray (drgray1@uno.edu) if you’re interested. Please note that if you have expressed interest in volunteering in the past, don’t hesitate to contact us again. Our open lab days change each semester, so there may be new opportunities available.

This past summer’s research resulted in the identification of what appears to be another French Colonial-era structure towards the back of the lot, beneath another dense deposit of material dating from the 1790s. Expanding our sample of the earlier Colonial era material was a point of emphasis for the final phase of field work, though it will still take some time to make sense of this rich and complex site.

More pottery from the ca. 1790s deposit in the rear of the lot. In the foreground are pieces of relatively rare Liverpool creamware printed with a sailing ship and fragments of overglaze painted creamware.

Shelves of artifacts recovered from 810 Royal Street.

Early to mid-18th century artifacts recovered from 810 Royal.

Lead seal from Montauban, a French town that specialized in the production of wools for the Native American trade in the 18th century.

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